on everything

THINK HUGE
cynicalidealism:

"My own opinion is that belief is the death of intelligence."

cynicalidealism:

"My own opinion is that belief is the death of intelligence."

UnLearn

techedblog:

UnLearn 101

As teachers we all have our own creative nature. Many of us express this creativity outside the classroom.

Check the new book Unlearn 101 by Kanwer Singh aka Humble The Poet an elementary school teacher and Toronto bred MC/Spoken Word Artist.

UnLearn

101 Simple Truths For A Better…

It is what we make out of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.

RIP Nelson Mandelawords to remember. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

5 Great Documentaries about Money and Economics

tetw:

Great films about money, business and finance

Inside Job - A critical examination of the causes of the crisis

Freakonomics - The film version of the nonfiction classic explores the hidden mechanics of everything from baby names to real estate, and cheating Sumo wrestlers to motivating teenagers

The Ascent of Money - A financial history of the world

Collapse - A controversial theory about peak energy, the financial crisis, and the demise of consumer culture

No Logo - ‘Brands, Globalization and Resistance’

amandapalmer:

"beauty standards come and go…it’s as if woman play genetic roulette ever 20 years or so. i for one am tired of spinning the wheel."
(thanks @lindsaykatt’s twitter feed.)

amandapalmer:

"beauty standards come and go…it’s as if woman play genetic roulette ever 20 years or so. i for one am tired of spinning the wheel."

(thanks @lindsaykatt’s twitter feed.)

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations. Architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable. Originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said, ‘It’s not where you take things from. It’s where you take them to.’

—Jim Jarmusch (via kadrey)

(via emergentfutures)

Bijan Sabet: Jeff Bezos: Regret Minimization Framework

This is fantastic.

via Jeff Bezos, 2001

I went to my boss and said to him, “You know, I’m going to go do this crazy thing and I’m going to start this company selling books online.” This was something that I had already been talking to him about in a sort of more general context, but then he…

I have never voted. Like most people I am utterly disenchanted by politics. Like most people I regard politicians as frauds and liars and the current political system as nothing more than a bureaucratic means for furthering the augmentation and advantages of economic elites. Billy Connolly said: “Don’t vote, it encourages them,” and, “The desire to be a politician should bar you for life from ever being one.”

I don’t vote because to me it seems like a tacit act of compliance; I know, I know my grandparents fought in two world wars (and one World Cup) so that I’d have the right to vote. Well, they were conned. As far as I’m concerned there is nothing to vote for. I feel it is a far more potent political act to completely renounce the current paradigm than to participate in even the most trivial and tokenistic manner, by obediently X-ing a little box.

Total revolution of consciousness and our entire social, political and economic system is what interests me, but that’s not on the ballot.

Russel Brand on Revolution (via hebrew-national)

Deep had it been the words of a philosopher. Coming from an “entertainer”. Just wow! Respect.

(Source: thefreelioness, via gravity-rainbow)

nevver:

Where are you from?

Sums up my identity.

nevver:

Where are you from?

Sums up my identity.

What does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call “the market” reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) But even more, it shows that most people in these jobs are ultimately aware of it. In fact, I’m not sure I’ve ever met a corporate lawyer who didn’t think their job was bullshit. The same goes for almost all the new industries outlined above. There is a whole class of salaried professionals that, should you meet them at parties and admit that you do something that might be considered interesting (an anthropologist, for example), will want to avoid even discussing their line of work entirely. Give them a few drinks, and they will launch into tirades about how pointless and stupid their job really is.

How can one even begin to speak of dignity in labour when one secretly feels one’s job should not exist?This is a profound psychological violence here. How can one even begin to speak of dignity in labour when one secretly feels one’s job should not exist? How can it not create a sense of deep rage and resentment. Yet it is the peculiar genius of our society that its rulers have figured out a way, as in the case of the fish-fryers, to ensure that rage is directed precisely against those who actually do get to do meaningful work. For instance: in our society, there seems a general rule that, the more obviously one’s work benefits other people, the less one is likely to be paid for it. Again, an objective measure is hard to find, but one easy way to get a sense is to ask: what would happen were this entire class of people to simply disappear? Say what you like about nurses, garbage collectors, or mechanics, it’s obvious that were they to vanish in a puff of smoke, the results would be immediate and catastrophic. A world without teachers or dock-workers would soon be in trouble, and even one without science fiction writers or ska musicians would clearly be a lesser place. It’s not entirely clear how humanity would suffer were all private equity CEOs, lobbyists, PR researchers, actuaries, telemarketers, bailiffs or legal consultants to similarly vanish. (Many suspect it might markedly improve.) Yet apart from a handful of well-touted exceptions (doctors), the rule holds surprisingly well.

Even more perverse, there seems to be a broad sense that this is the way things should be. This is one of the secret strengths of right-wing populism. You can see it when tabloids whip up resentment against tube workers for paralysing London during contract disputes: the very fact that tube workers can paralyse London shows that their work is actually necessary, but this seems to be precisely what annoys people. It’s even clearer in the US, where Republicans have had remarkable success mobilizing resentment against school teachers, or auto workers (and not, significantly, against the school administrators or auto industry managers who actually cause the problems) for their supposedly bloated wages and benefits. It’s as if they are being told “but you get to teach children! Or make cars! You get to have real jobs! And on top of that you have the nerve to also expect middle-class pensions and health care?”

If someone had designed a work regime perfectly suited to maintaining the power of finance capital, it’s hard to see how they could have done a better job. Real, productive workers are relentlessly squeezed and exploited. The remainder are divided between a terrorised stratum of the, universally reviled, unemployed and a larger stratum who are basically paid to do nothing, in positions designed to make them identify with the perspectives and sensibilities of the ruling class (managers, administrators, etc) – and particularly its financial avatars – but, at the same time, foster a simmering resentment against anyone whose work has clear and undeniable social value. Clearly, the system was never consciously designed. It emerged from almost a century of trial and error. But it is the only explanation for why, despite our technological capacities, we are not all working 3-4 hour days.

David Graeber, On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs

I think we should start pushing for the 3 day workweek.

(via stoweboyd)

(via stoweboyd)

nevver:

Back to work

Monday.

watershedplus:

The floating village of Koh Pannyi, Phand Nga bay, thailand.
Photographs by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.

(via npr)

humansofnewyork:

"I try to spew my thoughts for ten minutes everyday."

humansofnewyork:

"I try to spew my thoughts for ten minutes everyday."

The consumer PC market will implode quicker than anybody thinks

That looks a lot like the future of the consumer computing market to me. Personal computers will be a relatively expensive high-end product that people buy every five or seven or 10 years, when their old one breaks or becomes absolutely unusable. Sort of like big-screen TVs. Some of those PCs will be notebooks, but people won’t use them portably as much as moving them from room to room around the house.

For everything else, people will buy tablets. The second (and third, and fourth) computer in every house will be a tablet. Every kid’s first computer (after their smartphone) will be a tablet. If you take a computer on vacation, it will be a tablet. Eventually, the computer most of us take on work trips will probably be a tablet, too. (Whether it runs Windows, OS X, Android, iOS, or something else — that remains to be seen.) 

Read more

We’ve come a long way, in a short period of time. Would’ve been a provocative article few years back, now it’s simply stating the reality.

youngprogressivevoices:

That sets a whole new perspective on things,

youngprogressivevoices:

That sets a whole new perspective on things,

(Source: youngprogressivevoices, via evangotlib)